Aquarium Price List – A Detailed Breakdown

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After performing our own conclusive and independent studies, we created an Aquarium Price List to help save you time and energy. We tested these aquariums for their craftsmanship, we looked at customer reviews, and made sure they clean easily. This is often overlooked when purchasing an aquarium, some aquarium smear and smudge much worse than others.

Aquarium Price List

5 Gallon Tanks

Wonderful for Beta fish or Goldfish, 5-gallon fish tanks are great for a countertop, desk, or something of the sort. These tanks run rather small, meaning you can keep them out in the open. Another great thing about 5-gallon aquariums is the ability to easily and cheaply decorate the entire thing. It won’t cost you hundreds of dollars to find props or rocks. Keeping a 5-gallon tank well-lit is also very cheap with LEDs, some of which come with the tanks listed below.

Our #1 pick: $50.00

Glass Marineland Contoured Aquarium Kit

Our #1 pick for the 5-gallon aquarium spot was an easy choice. Marineland is already a highly reputable aquarium supplier and this product is certainly not a let-down. Coming in 3 or 5 gallons, the sleek frameless corners and an overhead LED strip give it a clean look that fits phenominaly in any style home or office. Thick, real glass and superior craftsmanship mean this tank will last a lifetime.

Budget Option: $37.00 (shipping included)

Basic, Clear, 5.5 Gallon Aquarium

This one is pretty self-explanatory. No kits and no lights, but you are getting the cheapest option available that is still reliable. This aquarium is made of thick glass than cleans well.

10 Gallon Tanks

The Cheapest Option: $28 (with shipping)

Aqueon 10 Gallon Glass Aquarium

Another reliable brand on our list, Aqueon, has been in the aquarium business for decades. Their glass is top of the line and certainly reliable. You may not be getting and bells and whistles with this fella, it sure doesn’t break the bank.

Our Recommendation: $119 (shipping included)

Hygger Horizon 8 Gallon Aquarium Kit

Hear us out. This bad boy is top. of. the. line. With a low-power high-output 7W pump included, and 18W adjustable color LED, glass bowed front (this stuff is expensive in and of itself folks), and included rockscape, this kit is actually a bargain. For anybody looking to do a one-stop-shop for aquarium setup, this is it.

20 Gallon Tanks

20-Gallon aquariums are a great size for many species of fish. At this size, saltwater tanks become an option as does a little more crowding. 20-gallon tanks are also among the most reasonably priced, since smaller tanks cost sometimes the same as 20-gallons, and anything above 40-gallons can cost in the hundreds.

Budget 20-Gallon Tank: $108

Tetra 20-Gallon Aquarium Kit

Another great bargain on our list is the Tetra 20-gallon kit. This setup includes the aquarium, LED lights connected to the hood, a quiet filter, water heater, and artificial plants. While this tank isn’t recommended for saltwater, it is great for a freshwater kit.

Our Recommendation: $129

15-Gallon Hagen Fluval Flex

A serious quality aquarium. You can never go wrong with the bowed front, as these provide panoramic views into the background of the aquarium. On top of the bowed, high quality, glass craftsmanship, this kit includes 2500 lux LEDs, with 7500k supporting plant growth. 130-gph 3-stage filtration is included with multi-directional dual outputs. A solid find, we believe.

Anything Above 20 Gallons

The Only Option

Live Marine Sand

If you want to start any tank over 20-gallons, you only have one choice. Start from scratch. Buying kits or aquariums online for anything above 20-gallons becomes much too expensive. Proceed with the following steps for any tank above 20- gallons:

1: Purchase 1-pound of sand for every gallon of water you want

For example: Suzy says “I want a 200-gallon fish tank.” Mark replies “You need 10 bags of CaribSea 20-lb Live Sand.”

2: While you wait for the sand in the mail, go buy the aquarium you want from a local store

Don’t buy any live rock or animals yet, we aren’t ready yet.

3: Fill the aquarium with either saltwater or freshwater and wait until sand arrives (if sand has already arrived, wait at least 24 hours)

You can turn on your filtration after the water is inside the aquarium and you are waiting.

4: Pour the sand in your aquarium, wait 36 hours.

During this step you can also add live rock, any non-living props, etc. (everything that isn’t alive)

5: Your aquarium is ready for fish, corals, or anything you’d like!

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